How to reconcile the forecasts held by plaintiffs and defendants in litigation.

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It is uncertain what path hurricanes will take, how strong they may become, what areas will be impacted and what damage may result.   There are countless forecasts trying to predict exactly what will happen; however, only time will tell.   Trying to predict the path of hurricanes is a lot like trying to predict the outcome of a lawsuit. There are always a wide variety of estimates and disagreement over what a court might ultimately decide to award and it is such disagreement that leads people to file and foolishly pursue so many lawsuits in the first place. Plaintiffs overestimate what they think they can get and defendants underestimate their liability and exposure. Only time will tell.   Here are a couple of litigation facts and forecasts that you can rely upon with a reasonable degree of certainty; 1) in over 95% of lawsuits, the courts do not decide the case and 2) you should prepare to spend between $40,000 to $122,000 in legal fees and costs to go the distance for that 5% or less chance to get to trial.

Unlike hurricanes, you can control the path and outcome of lawsuits and disputes.

Unlike hurricanes, you can control the path and outcome of lawsuits.   You don’t have to wait and see what a court will do and you don’t have to rely on attorneys to try to extract information from a hostile adversary to determine what path to take.  Instead, you can ask the court to gather up all the parties in a room to confidentially discuss and try to work out a settlement under the direction of a trained mediator.   Mediators are neutral and are specially trained to look at all sides of a dispute. Mediators can then help to resolve and reconcile all the various opinions and interests. Mediators gather information, separate facts from fiction and help put everyone into a calmer, more informed mindset to make decisions. LEARN MORE.

Show your support of less litigation and more private resolution of conflicts and disputes.

Up to this point, mediation has remained largely a court-annexed process, meaning that lawyers and judges tend to decide if and when people mediate.  We think people should be able to decide for themselves.   If you agree, please comment and let us know. Visit our website, subscribe to our blog and follow us on Twitter.

 

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